Good Morning, Podcasters!
Good Morning, Podcasters!

Episode 10 · 7 months ago

Microphones Are Going Quantum!

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Have scientiests 700 miles southeast of The Hague built a smaller, better microphone? It seems so! It's a ways from making its way to prosumer level pro-audio, but, you never know! Perhaps your next microphone will have the highest signal-to-noise ratio there ever was!

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The article from Stuttgart University : https://gmpod.co/quantum-stuttgart 

Buzzsprout's new sharing pages : https://gmpod.co/buzzsprout-share-pages 

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Review on Apple Podcasts : https://gmpod.co/apple

Review on Spotify Podcasts : https://gmpod.co/spotify

Review on Podchaser : https://gmpod.co/podchaser

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Good morning podcasters. Today we're going to be talking about science. That's up next. FIRST UP, housekeeping. This podcast is brought to you by podcast studio pro, now with a more minimal, easier to navigate website. If keeping your podcast organized, that is to say your show notes, you're talking points, your links and references, is a challenge for you, you've got to check out podcast studio pro. Free trials have been extended to fourteen days and you should go start yours today. Go to podcast studio procom or check the show notes for a link for more information and to sign up and start your free trial. Personal victory for me. My Book Practical Stoicism is already at number one hundred and sixty seven in the social philosophy category of Amazon in paperback, which is Hella Cool and I'm excited about it. That's got nothing to do with podcasting, but I wanted to share it anyway. Here's a big personal announcement. I'm exploring the process of expatriating, to drum roll please,...

...but a New Zealand. I've got a few friends down there that seemed willing to help me make the transition, and you know what a nice little studio on an island, in a place where the average year round temperature is sixty eight degrees sounds just absolutely swell. Will I do it? Who knows? I have the means and the motivation to do it, but I do often have grand ideas that lose steam and my interest quickly. Why don't you tell me why I should it or shouldn't commit fully to expatriating to New Zealand? I'd love to know your thoughts on it, so send me an email. That's all for housekeeping. Let's get to the science. The first big podcast interview I ever got was with Shawn Carol and I was psyched to speak with him. This was a while ago, this is back in two thousand and thirteen or so, and he was on tour promoting his new book, the particle at the end of the universe, which was all about the search for the Higgs bow zone. And by the end of it, the book and the interview, I was just enamored with the idea of particle physics and...

...quantum mechanics. From there I went on a reading spree and spent the next couple of years boning up on the subject until I felt I knew as much as I could know without getting a formal education on the subject, which I certainly was not in the market to do and never was. But I continue to find any work going on at the quantum level, so to speak, to be absolutely fascinating. So when I read yesterday's edition of Pod News and saw a story about quantum microphones and signal to noise ratio and noise reduction, I was immediately curious and needed to know more. Rather than butcher an attempt to simplify the article that Pod News shared from Stuttgart University, I'm going to read it to you verbatim. Hopefully your eyes don't glaze over, but if they do, just deal with it for one episode. Okay, science stuff is cool too, especially when it has to do with podcasting. This article was published June twenty of this year and it's titled Using Quantum technology to ensure...

...were low noise microphones. Whether it's an online conference or a hearing aid, a high noise level in the microphones used or significant background noise will disrupt any conversation and better microphones are urgently needed. Researchers at the University of Stuttgard have now developed a quantum microphone that takes noise reduction to a whole new dimension. It was tested at stuttguards Olga Hospital with promising results. So far, the development of commercially available microphones has focused primarily on suppressing technical noise sources, such as signal amplification electronics. A research group led by Dr Florian Kaiser at the Institute of Physics Three at the University of Stuttgard has now gone one step further and investigated the fundamental limit up to which noise can be suppressed. They were able to show that using quantum technologies can push these limits. To this end, the group first developed a laser microphone similar to those used for monitoring industrial...

...machinery and in espionage. However, as expected, this classical laser microphone was limited in its performance capability by electrical noise present during the measurement process. In the next step, the classical laser light was replaced by specifically adapted quantum light, which directly improved the signal to noise ratio by point five seven decibels. Now, this might not seem like a lot at first glands. However, it is a significant improvement in low signal to noise environments such as those commonly found in the communication between flight controllers and airplane pilots. To conduct a measurements, researchers teamed up with the Olga Hospital in Stuttgart to conduct a medically approved speech recognition trial on forty five subjects. The aim of the study was to determine the minimum required sound level above which patients correctly understood fifty percent of the words being said. The study found that more than seventy one percent of the...

...subjects were able to immediately recognize the improvement provided by the quantum microphone. Quote. The results are mainly based on the high rate at which we generate entangled photons, as well as the subsequent quantum state conversion from a multi photon state to a single Photon state, explains Project Coordinator, Dr Florian Kaiser, from the Third Institute of Physics at the University of Stuttgard. They continue quote. The resulting increase in measurements by a factor of tenzero compared to previous approaches, enable us to increase measurement rates up to one hundred killer hurts, which allows us to comfortably cover the audio band twenty hurts to Twentyzero hurts. Additionally, thanks to the quantum state conversion, we can now use the same cost effective detectors that we use for the classical laser microphone. This is, of course, very interesting from a commercial perspective and quote doctoral researcher Raphael knowled adds quote.

Our approach is not limited to use in quantum microphones. We also see great potential for our technology in imaging examinations of light sensitive bio specimens. The current work already demonstrates that competitive quantum imaging is possible with commercially available enhancements. And quote Doctor Maria t Perez Zabalos, who brought the experience she gained whilst writing her doctoral thesis at the university in Las Palmos, Spain, in the research adds quote. My doctoral thesis concentrated on psychoacoustic experiments with air traffic controllers as well as people with hearing impairments. For me, this interdisciplinary research gives a glimpse of the medical technology innovations we will be able to enjoy in fifty years, although the commercialization of this approach is still a long way off due to the high energy consumption required to generate quantum light. A concept of quantum state conversion before light detection has the potential to become a game changer for future...

...research studies. Quote. Our next steps will involve benefiting from the tremendous advancements made in intermediate quantum photonics to implement the entire set up on a photonic chip. and quote, says Doctor Florian Kaiser. They continue. Quote. Having such compact systems at hand would enable a plethora of applications covering fundamental research, bioimaging, to effective public exhibitions and experiments in which people can directly experience quantum technologies. and quote. Now, all of that was super sciency and some of you got it and some of you didn't, but all of you were probably like, Goddamn, that sounds pretty fucking cool, and that is why I wanted to share it. I hope you enjoyed hearing it. Today's question comes from Matt at Castos, and he asked can be to be brands with relatively low budgets be successful outsourcing their podcast production? Thanks for the question, Matt. Relatively is a tricky word, so let me start with what I...

...think is a fair rate for outsourcing your podcast production and also what I think outsourcing your podcast production means or should mean. I'll start in reverse. I think outsourcing your podcast production means you're hiring talent and a team to do the podcast for you. If that's what it means, then in my eyes, a fair price for that. Assuming a two times a month podcast, which is common for businesses. They're not doing every week, sometimes they're only monthly, but every other week is pretty common. So we're talking twenty four episodes a year. Here's what I think. You've got a producer, a writer, a Scheduler, a host and an audio editor engineer. The producer and writer will spend probably five hours on each episode, so that's ten hours. The editors last engineer will spend, you know, three to five hours, so let's call that for that's fourteen hours. The talent and the writer will spend a lot of time together and let's say that they'll each spend two to three hours preps mode. So let's call it three times two is six,...

...and that makes a total of twenty hours. Toss in two hours for the Scheduler, who will be used for odds and ends type things, because scheduling won't take that much time, and you're looking at somewhere around twenty two hours. Worth of work per episode, and that's divided up amongst five people, so about four hours and change worth of work per person. If you wanted to just average it out, I think a hundred and fifty dollars an hour is a good flat rate. The individuals to whom you're outsourcing the team can figure out their respective pay rates, but a hundred and fifty dollars an hour is a good hourly to pay a team to do this sort of job. That's thirty three hundred dollars an episode or sixty six hundred dollars a month for two episodes a month. Were roughly Eightyzero a year. Now you might be hearing this and thinking that's fucking bonkers. That's a lot of money, but you're wrong. PODCAST production is a full team effort, especially if you are a globally recognized brand or an emerging brand. Matt didn't necessarily say you were...

...a small brand, just that you had a limited budget. No company could bring in five, even part time employees for Eightyzero a year. Not a chance. The next thing you're thinking is, well, this isn't a full time job. You just outline the hours, so I'm paying. If we split it all evenly, every member of the team, and I'm going to go ahead and save you some time here. Thirty an hour. Is A kick ASS podcast production? Worth thirty an hour per podcast team member? Yeah, as I'd say, it is, and you should say that to thirty dollars an hour for someone's unique skill set is a really, really good rate. You're not paying that much. I think you'd actually be getting a killer deal. Now Matt's question was could be to be brands with, quote, relatively low budgets. Blah, blah, blah, Blah Blah. A low budget certainly blows, at least in probably most of our opinions, Eightyzero a year out of the water right. Well, I don't know. I wouldn't be so sure, because if the podcast is a sales revenue vertical, then...

...your eightyzero investment might bring in a million dollars worth of sales a year. But I digress. Let's assume you don't have eightyzero a year. Could you still be successful? Of course, but you're going to have to temper your expectations because you're going to have to approach external production with a one to two person team that will likely include a less white glove less polished resulting product, and you'll certainly need to act as your own talent. Leveraging someone on your existing team to do research and write a script and to handle scheduling is a reasonable thing to drop on a kid in the marketing department. Okay, those aren't necessarily difficult things and they're not extremely time consuming. They probably already know how to do those things. But for the more intense stuff, like the editing and engineering especially, you're going to want to seek a small to midsize podcast production agency. They'd probably offer editing, engineering and marketing services to you for around five hundred dollars an episode or, in this example, of thousand...

...dollars a month or twelve thousand dollars a year, which is a far more affordable arrangement. But regardless of how much you spend to do it, success is going to come down to the quality of your production, the skill and effort put into marketing it and the chemistry that exists among the team members of your quote unquote, outsourced team. Can you be a small bee to be company and do this well, even if you don't have a big budget? Yes, of course. You've just got to make careful, thoughtful decisions about how you're spending your money. I hope that helps man. STORY NUMBER TWO COMES.

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